20 Reasons I Love My Elementary Education Major

It took me a really long time to figure out what major I wanted to declare in college. I felt, and I still feel, that eighteen is too young to decide what career path to choose. While many students change their major many times, I’ve never been casual about choosing and switching my major. I’ve always felt that choosing a major is a declaration of how your life will be lived. Choosing one major over another impacts the trajectory of your life in every way. Your career dictates where you live, your income, your ability to have a family, and many other elements of a person’s life.

After lots and lots of rumination and investigation, I chose a major: elementary education. I took a few prerequisite classes and realized I LIKE my major. This year, I’ve started taking my “upper division” courses, meaning that all of the classes I’m taking are major specific. Never again do I have to take a college algebra, American history, or statistics class… THANK GOODNESS!!! Because I’m now in major specific classes, I’ve come to realize that I LOVE majoring in elementary education! I’m sure you’re wondering why I love my major and being a pre-professional teacher so much, so I’m going to tell you! If you feel a list coming on, you’re right! Here goes:

20. Getting to look silly with your students while you dance around with them to the “Days of the Week Song.”

19. Being able to come home with funny stories everyday because kids really do do the funniest things.

18. Being able to learn from experienced teachers that have made inconceivable impacts in the lives of so many students.

17. The plethora of children’s books.

16. Being in a career that keeps you on your toes with ever evolving innovations and ingenuity.

15. Having the ability to be creative.

14. Connecting with families.

13. Watching the look on the face of a child when the “light bulb goes on.”

12. Being part of a career where there is a close network of supportive professionals to gain ideas from and give ideas to.

11. Increasing confidence in your ability to speak publicly and off-the-cuff.

10. The satisfaction of feeling like you executed a successful lesson that had the students really enthused.

9. The love and appreciation your students show you with hugs and thanks.

8. Learning to be an excellent problem solver.

7. Setting up an appealing, fun, warm, welcoming, and education-rich classroom.

6. Being able to share cute stories and tidbits with your students.

5. Watching your students become totally captivated by a good book.

4. The opportunity to learn from your students.

3. Watching students develop intellectually and become excited about learning.

2. Inspiring students to be the very best version of themselves and helping them to realize their full potential.

1. Knowing that you have the ability to mold the minds of students who have the potential to go so far. Every future neurosurgeon, president, Supreme Court justice, and every other professional walk through the doors of a teacher.

We’re living in a time when every motivation to become a teacher is being removed. Teachers are having their rights stripped of them, their benefits slashed, and their pay depleted. Nevertheless, the idea of being a teacher excites me in every way and I am not discouraged by the removal of so many of our impetuses to become a teacher. I love being an elementary education major and I love being a pre-professional teacher. The idea of preparing my classroom for the first day of school and the first day of “mind-molding” is so exciting to me! I’m glad I waited to pick my major because I know I’m headed in the right direction.  

The “Pros” and “Cons” of School

The start of another semester of college lends itself to being a consistent whirlwind, and as a result, my blog has sat untouched and neglected. In honor of the semester having officially begun, I’ve made a list of all of the things a new school year entails and I’m listing the pros and cons of each! Here we go!

1. The new school year means new classes.

Pro: New people and new, interesting information (hopefully!).

Con: Schoolwork and studying=social life killers!

2. New textbooks.

Pro: The smell of new books (Am I the only one that likes this, because if I am, this is really embarrassing!)

Con: The exorbitant cost incurred by having to get new textbooks.

3. Back to school parties.

Pro: It’s so much fun to be reunited with friends you haven’t seen all summer.

Con: I can’t think of any… can you?

4. Fall sports.

Pro: Lots of school spirit and lots of fun!

Con: The rare occasion when your team loses. 😦

5. Reunions with friends.

Pro: The whole gang is back together again!

Con: Um, nothing!!!

6. Being back in my apartment.

Pro: Being in my own space.

Con: The whole college food situation. I could really go for some home cookin’ by mom and dad!

Okay, so my list isn’t very extensive or very good, but, as timing would have it, I have to get back to my schoolwork! I’ll blog again as soon as possible!

College and the Quarter-Life: Lessons You Won’t Learn in the Classroom 101

I’d like to preface this post by saying that I truly think you will learn so much more outside of the classroom than you will in it (of course, the content is different in nature). I’d like to add that I’m no life expert, so don’t think that this list of five life lessons means I know much of anything… I don’t!! Living will be the greatest teacher and these are just a few pieces of wisdom I’ve gathered along the way!

Happy living! 🙂 🙂 🙂

1)   You, and only you, are your best advocate.

Friends and family create a wonderful support system and I’m not suggesting that they do not love you, look out for you, and hope for the best for you- they do. I’ve learned, however, that you are the one who needs to make your voice heard and who needs to take charge. Even if they wanted to, no one else can do that for you.

2)   You aren’t ENTITLED to anything. “Entitlement” doesn’t exist.

Nothing is ever handed to you. Your life is a product of what you have earned.

3)   School comes first. A social life is secondary.

Of course, going out and being with friends is fun, but it’s easy to lose sight of the reason we go to college and take classes… for our education! Our educations are the keys to our futures (it sounds cliché, but you and I both know it’s true!) and while a social life is also beneficial, we need to remember our true purpose for being at college.

4)   Trying to be someone you’re not automatically diminishes your chances of success.

If you don’t want to be yourself why should anyone else want to be with you, work with you, be friends with you, or hire you? Be yourself and everything will fall into place. “Who you are is a declaration of independence in itself!”

5)   The word “no” is a powerful tool… use it.

This is a concept I have had trouble grasping in the past, but once I learned how to say “no” a weight was lifted off of my shoulders. It doesn’t make you mean, rude, incompetent, or any other negative thing if you make use of the word “no.” No one will think any less of you because you have a limit. In fact, they’ll probably think, “Wow, they know what they’re doing.” Saying “no” is a strength.

 

Are there any life lessons you’ve learned? Please share them with me!

Spelling Bee Life Lessons

I am the typo queen, but… there is a difference between a typo and just plain spelling something incorrectly. I know that grammar, spelling, and all of that good stuff were only last discussed in elementary school, but there really is no excuse for not being able to write correctly. After all, that word was created with specific meaning and purpose for its use in the intricate English language- we certainly don’t have any right to mess with that! This isn’t a rant I go off on everyday; however, with the recent completion of the 2011 National Spelling Bee, I thought I would use this opportunity to compile a list of some commonly mispelled misspelled words in the English language.

I MUST make special note of three little words: there, their, and they’re. I’ve never found these words very difficult to differentiate, but, apparently, I’m in the minority.

There refers to a place. It could be used in a sentence such as, “She is over there.” Their implies possession. It could be used in a sentence such as, “Their dog is so sweet.” They’re means they are. It could be used in a sentence such as, “They’re such nice people.” I’m so glad that that’s cleared up. Here goes my list:

A lot                                       Gauge

Absence                                Guarantee

Acceptable                           Hierarchy

Accidentally                        Independent

Accommodate                     Leisure

All right                                Loose

Amateur                                Lose

Atheist                                  Maneuver

Broccoli                                Misspell

Bureau                                  Neighbor

Candidate                            Pastime

Category                               Principal

Ceiling                                  Principle

Collectible                           Questionnaire

Colonel                                 Receive

Column                                 Rhyme

Conscience                           Rhythm

Conscientious                      Vacuum

Conscious                              Wednesday

Deceive

Definitely

Dumbbell

Embarrassment

Exercise

February

Fluorescent

Foreign

Like I said, this isn’t a rant I go off on frequently, but I just couldn’t pass up the opportunity to make note of how the English language is so often taken for granted. Of course, I don’t mean any harm or disrespect, but learn to speak and write properly! I assure you that it will serve you well!